NORTH CAROLINA PRO BONO REPORTING FORM: JANUARY 1, 2019 – MARCH 31, 2019

  • The North Carolina Pro Bono Resource Center is collecting information on attorney participation in activities covered under Rule 6.1 of the Rules of Professional Conduct, adopted by the North Carolina State Bar in 2010.

    These activities include:
    (1) providing pro bono legal services,
    (2) providing legal services at a substantially reduced fee,
    (3) participating in activities to improve the law, the legal system or the legal profession and
    (4) financially supporting legal service providers.

    For more information about the above activities included in Rule 6.1, please visit the Reporting Frequently Asked Questions.

    Additionally, the Preamble to the Rules of Professional Conduct addresses participation in community service and volunteer activities; this form also collects information about that involvement.

    This information will be used to quantify the level of pro bono service by North Carolina attorneys, to identify ways to improve presenting pro bono opportunities and to recognize North Carolina attorneys for significant and/or sustained pro bono service.

    Personally identifiable information provided through this survey will be shared with third parties ONLY (a) to the extent necessary to recognize the reporting attorney for their reported involvement AND (b) as long as the reporting attorney does not choose to remain anonymous at the end of the form.

    Attorneys licensed in North Carolina (or providing legal services under North Carolina Pro Bono Practice Status) who report 50 hours of pro bono legal services in 2018 (and do not choose to remain anonymous) will be inducted into the 2018 North Carolina Pro Bono Honor Society and will receive a certificate from the Supreme Court of North Carolina recognizing their achievement.

    Thank you for your participation!


  • PRO BONO LEGAL SERVICE

  • Rule 6.1 states that lawyers should aspire to provide 50 hours of pro bono legal service each year to:

    (1) persons of limited means;

    (2) charitable, religious, civic, community, governmental and educational organizations in matters that are designed primarily to address the needs of persons of limited means or

    (3) individuals, groups or organizations seeking to secure or protect civil rights, civil liberties or public rights, or charitable, religious, civic, community, governmental and educational organizations in matters in furtherance of their organizational purposes, where the payment of standard legal fees would significantly deplete the organization's economic resources or would be otherwise inappropriate.

    See Reporting Frequently Asked Questions for more information.


  • LEGAL SERVICE AT A SUBSTANTIALLY REDUCED FEE

  • Rule 6.1 states that in addition to providing pro bono legal services, a lawyer should provide legal services to persons or organizations of limited means at a substantially reduced fee.

    See Reporting Frequently Asked Questions for more information.

  • ACTIVITY THAT IMPROVES THE LAW, THE LEGAL SYSTEM, OR THE LEGAL PROFESSION

  • Rule 6.1 states that in addition to providing pro bono legal services, a lawyer should provide any additional services by participating in activities that improve the law, the legal system or the legal profession.

    Examples of these activities are:

    (1) leadership or active participation in professional legal associations, committees and commissions at the national, state, regional and local levels;

    (2) service on boards of organizations that provide legal services to persons of limited means and/or coordinate pro bono activities;

    (3) participation in Law Day or Constitution Day activities;

    (4) service as a mediator, arbitrator, or continuing legal education instructor or

    (5) engagement in legislative lobbying to improve the law, legal system, or legal profession.

    See Reporting Frequently Asked Questions for more information.


  • NON-LEGAL COMMUNITY SERVICE

  • The Preamble to the Rules of Professional Conduct, paragraph 8, states in relevant part that each lawyer has a basic responsibility to volunteer to provide community service and community leadership.

    Examples of these non-legal activities are volunteering at schools, hospitals, churches, food banks, soup kitchens and disaster relief centers, and membership on the board of a non-legal charitable organization.

    See Reporting Frequently Asked Questions for more information.


  • FINANCIAL SUPPORT OF LEGAL SERVICE PROVIDERS

  • Rule 6.1 states "a lawyer should voluntarily contribute financial support to organizations that provide legal services to persons of limited means."

    See Reporting Frequently Asked Questions for more information.


  • ATTORNEY INFORMATION

  • If you are licensed in North Carolina, please share your North Carolina License information. If you do not report North Carolina license information, you will not be recognized as part of the North Carolina Honor Society (unless you practice under Pro Bono Practice Status with the State Bar – please select that option if appropriate).
  • Please share the ID number for your state of licensure – please note that this number is separate from any voluntary bar associations of which you may be a member.
  • If you are licensed in multiple states, please include any additional state licensure information here.

  • The only personally identifiable information from this form that will be shared with third parties will be for recognition purposes (e.g. a certificate of recognition from the Supreme Court of North Carolina). However, you may choose not to share this information. Checking this box means that your pro bono service will not be shared for recognition purposes, and you will not be a member of the NC Pro Bono Honor Society, even if you are otherwise eligible.